What we read this week (14 Oct)

Every week, we filter a few of the most relevant articles about the digital business for you.

  • How Bit.ly Now Predicts the Future
    Link shortening and social web analytics provider Bit.ly announced the first Enterprise product built on top of its new search platform, a reputation tracking alert system. Unlike other social media monitoring services, Bit.ly says it will predict which brand-new pages online will receive a lot of traffic in the future. Thus what Bit.ly’s customers should pay attention to.

  • CMOs Struggle to Acclimate to Changing Landscape
    “78% expect more complexity over the next five years, but only 48% are prepared to deal with more complexity.” That’s what we’re here for …

  • what complexity are you mirroring?
    Bud Caddell about the need of agencies to stop adapting to their client’s structures to be able to solve their problems in the future.

  • Up and Down the Ladder of Abstraction
    A brilliant web essay for a systematic approach to interactive visualization by Bret Victor.

  • FAZ Blogs: Der Medienwandel hat sich nochmals beschleunigt
    A recent study provides some hard facts & figures about the internet as a news source in Germany. While the trend towards the web as main news source is obvious, it’s noteworthy how dramatically this differs depending on education levels.

  • A Unified Theory for Information Consumption
    The infamous CmdrTaco, founder of Slashdot, shares some deeper insights about how we consume information, and how tools could be better structured to allow for more human consumption of the amounts of info we dig through every day.

  • Google Wave, Reincarnated
    Two startups picked Google’s Wave technology and building new products on top of it. We actually developed the concept for Third Wave in Google Wave and were kinda sad when it got canceled.

  • Clive Thompson on Memory Engineering
    Clive Thompson on memory engineering: “Right now, of course, our digital lives are so bloated they’re basically imponderable. Many of us generate massive amounts of personal data every day — phonecam pictures, text messages, status updates, and so on. By default, all of us are becoming lifeloggers. But we almost never go back and look at this stuff, because it’s too hard to parse.”

  • UrbanTick: Trendsmap Paints Twitter Maps
    Trendsmap have produced visualisations for a number of cities from around the world plotting locations of georeferenced tweets. The series is called Paint a City by Numbers and so far covers only a doyen places, but is poised to grow with Trendsmap having access to a lot of Twitter data through their service.

  • Seoul on Display: How Global Screen Culture Will Affect Us
    Jan Chipchase, executive creative director at frog, offers a glimpse into a possible future of how we will interact with screens by showing how Seoul is already doing it. Fascinating.

What we read this week (7 Oct)

This week our picks for your weekend reading deal with Google and its competition, mobile marketing, Starbucks’ branding genius and a deep essay about the open web.

Our picks of the week for your weekend reading:

  • Monday Note: Google’s “Interesting” Week
    Google finds itself increasingly surrounded by companies who rival between each other, but also with Google itself. Mostly, because Google is extending its reach into different markets, especially with Android. Read the full article for an overview about Nokia, Samsung, Intel, Amazon and many more.
  • How Starbucks Transformed Coffee From A Commodity Into A $4 Splurge
    Although we’re not big fans of Starbucks coffee (too second wave), we can appreciate the branding work behind it. This interview with Stanley Hainsworth, creative director for brands like Nike, Lego, Starbucks and Gatorade, provides some refreshing thoughts about classic branding.
  • Study: Mobile advertising will generate $1.2B in 2011
    A new study from eMarketer predicts mobile advertising will generate $1.23 billion in the United States this year.
  • Adrian Short: the end of the web as we know it
    “The promise of the open web looks increasingly uncertain”: an excellent, in-depth essay about the meaning & necessity of the open web, and insisting on controlling our own infrastructure.

You can see all our reading recommendations (including the archives) at “What we read this week“.

What we read this week (30 Sep)

Every week, we filter a few of the most relevant articles about the digital business for you.

What we read this week (23 Sep)

It was a week of light reading for us: Robot clocks, meaningful metrics and leadership by serendipity. You know, just the usual. Enjoy your reading.

It was a week of light reading for us. Here’s what we got for you.

  • BERG London: Product sketch: Clocks for Robots
    BERG in London has been thinking quite a bit about how to make the world robot-readable. Here are some thoughts (and sketches) on how time & place change, and can be made more easy to navigate, for robots. Meet the robot clock.
  • Love Metrics – Only Dead Fish
    Neil Perkin shares his thoughts on meaningful (as opposed to vanity) metrics.
  • Joi Ito: Thoughts on leadership
    “The cost of planning, predicting and managing rapidly changing, complex systems often exceeds the cost of actually doing whatever is being planned and managed.” Joi Ito on leadership in an age of decentralization, disruption and networked innovation. Embrace serendipity!

You can see all our reading recommendations (including the archives) at “What we read this week“.

What we read this week (16 Sep)

Every week, we filter a few of the most relevant articles about the digital business for you. This week the list features thoughts on the coming corporate revolution, computer-generated articles, digital publishing, and lessons to learn from Jay-Z and Kanye. Enjoy!

Every week, we filter a few of the most relevant articles about the digital business for you.

  • Forbes: Social Power and the Coming Corporate Revolution
    David Kirkpatrick is taking a look at how the social powers that brought down dictators will bring down company managements next, if a new generation is unhappy with their bosses. Largely ignored today, companies will have to face the effect of their employees talking about them very visibly online.
  • NYTimes: Computer-Generated Articles Are Gaining Traction
    A fascinating read on software that takes data, like that from sports statistics, company financial reports and housing starts and sales, and turns it into articles.
  • Forbes: Selling The New Cool: Inside The World Of ‘Influencers’
    Matthew Newton from Forbes digs into the marketing trend of ‘influencers’ but only focuses on so-called ‘tastemakers’. We think that ‘influence’ is much bigger than that. Nevertheless, a good read.
  • Economist: Great digital expectations
    The Economist takes a closer look at the challenges of the book publisher industry as ebooks take the lead in book sales and confront the industry with some heavy digitization challenges.
  • Foreign Policy: Jay-Z’s Hegemony in the Age of Kanye
    Watch the Throne therefore should not be judged as an album, but rather as a move in this savvy strategy of institutionalizing hegemony in the face of potential decline. Kanye and Jay-Z’s alliance offers a new blueprint for managing decline in a turbulent world from which international relations scholars and American foreign policy practitioners alike should learn.
  • T3N: Deutsche Unternehmen: Weltweit führend im Blockieren von Social Media
    Germany ahead of something related to social media? Yes, we’re on top when it comes to blocking access to social media at the work place. There’s a lot of lip service by managers about investing into social but their deeds speak a very different language. As long as managers keep the young generation from communicating like they’re used to, companies will compromise their work force and hurt their businesses.
  • AT&T Names Chief Medical Information Officer
    When telcos hire Chief Medical Information Officers you know that the world of healthcare is changing.
  • Ben Hammersley: My speech to the IAAC
    While already one week old, this is a must read: Our brilliant buddy Ben Hammersley on the importance of a “translation layer”, people who explain different strata of society how everything changes through digital disruption.

You can see all our reading recommendations (including the archives) at “What we read this week“.

What we read this week (9 Sep)

Every week, we filter a few of the most relevant articles about the digital business for you. Here’s our hand-selected reading list for the weekend. Enjoy!

It seems like last week’s first test round of our reading list hit a sweet spot. So we’ll try and do this on a weekly basis for a little while and see how it goes. Please do let us know if it’s helpful for you. I present to you a small selection of the most relevant things we read this week:

Enjoy your weekend reading!

Every week, we filter a few of the most relevant articles about the digital business for you. You can see all our recommendations (including the archives) at “What we read this week“.

What we read this week

There’s a lot to read out there, every day, every week. It’s part of our job to dig in and find the most relevant discussions. Thus I present to you an eclectic mix of some of the must read articles about what’s happening in the digital business.

There’s a lot to read out there, every day, every week. It’s part of our job to dig in and find the most relevant discussions. So we figured we might as well surface some of them to give you an at-a-glance overview of what we find relevant for our business. And thus I present to you an eclectic mix of some of the must read articles. If you have the time to read only a few articles this week about what’s happening in digital businesses, these are a good start.

I’m curious to learn if this is a useful format for you. Let me know!