What we read this week (20 Jul)

Our articles of the week talk about brands in science fiction, startups in the Philippines, mobile vs mobility, predicting violence with algorithms, and empathizing with machines.

Quotes of the week

The invisibility of something [doesn’t imply] its lack of being.

Werner Herzog

What if the “posthuman” isn’t being a cyborg but instead being a cell in a giant’s body, helping to enable a vast consciousness that you’re never aware of and that is never aware of you?

Alan Jacobs

Articles of the week

  • The New Yorker: A Word From Our Sponsors
    Science Fiction got it right again. It’s interesting to consider, in light of brand power struggles at the London Olympics, what impact marketing and corporate culture are having on everyday life. This is a good example of how speculative fiction can bring us to question such situations and ask ourselves: do we want that?
  • SGEntrepreneurs: The Philippine startup scene: Asia’s best kept secret?
    An in-depth article on the current state of the startup scene in the Philippines, particularly the cultural and economic factors that influence the choice of field for new companies.
  • David Armano: The Future Isn’t About Mobile; It’s About Mobility
    Throwing yourself out there isn’t enough anymore – this also applies to the mobile web ecosystem. David Armano recommends that we get acquainted with patterns in modern digital behavior and advises us to learn how to differentiate between mobile and mobility.
  • LA Times: Computer analysis predicted rises, ebbs in Afghanistan violence
    A group of friends, who happened to be computer experts, decided to make something out of the endless data on war in Afghanistan released by WikiLeaks in 2010. Based on the data they extracted by using simple code, they managed to predict fluctuations in the country’s violence.
  • Olivia Rosane: the ROOMBA whirrs for thee
    Reading through the @SelfAwareROOMBA Twitter feed has an uncanny effect: you begin to empathize with a machine. (A vacuum cleaner, no less.) Olivia Rosane does a beautiful job of analyzing the mechanics that cause us to experience genuine emotion in response to tweets from this lonely and perceptive character, and how a Twitter feed comes to take on a personality we can identify with.

We’ve put this week’s reads into a Readlist for your mobile perusal. Enjoy!