What we read this week (25 May)

Our reads this week: whether Facebook can be successful in the long term, how the mobile internet affects our approach to healthcare, what companies should focus on when recruiting, a new community for maker-minded kids, and insights on businesses operating at the intersection between technology and culture.

Quote of the week

The Singularity has always sounded to me like a secular version of the Rapture. It seems to fit very neatly into that same God-shaped hole.

William Gibson

Articles of the week

  • Bud Caddell: Emerging Bets at the Intersection of Technology & Culture
    Bud Caddell from Deutsch LA took his team of innovation strategists to SXSW this year to study all the startups launching there. They aggregated all their insights and put them into this report. It’s a great overview about current trends in the US startup world and what marketers can learn from them.
  • Fred Wilson: Culture and Fit
    Fred Wilson, head of Union Square Ventures, discusses some common mistakes made in companies’ hiring processes, and where the focus should really lie: culture and fit should be prized above talent and renown.
  • Technology Review: The Facebook Fallacy
    Michael Wolff explains how Facebook is not only on course to go bust, but will take the rest of the ad-supported Web with it. A controversial and compelling case on the state of affairs of ad-based online business, and why current methods cannot be successful in the long run.
  • O’Reilly Radar: Parsing a new Pew report: 3 ways the Internet is shaping healthcare
    Pew Internet and Life Project recently coducted a survey on how people inform themselves about health. Alex Howard breaks down the study’s findings into three key trends: Quantified Self, participatory medicine and what he calls the ‘new digital divide.’ Mobile health data, it seems, is particularly helpful, but in the hands of people who aren’t as likely to need it. The article prompts some interesting questions about how we could make this kind of information more accessible.
  • New York Times: Disruptions: A Beacon to Silicon Valley, From a Start-Up for Children
    Since our conversation with Zach last November, we have been eagerly awaiting the public appearance of his new venture. DIY is here and it is shaping up to be an interesting community for kids who make things. The kids post pictures of their work online, and can find inspiration in users’ projects, from melted crayon paintings to soda bottle rockets. It’s nice to see the Internet evolving in a way that appeals to a different age group.

Author: Maddie

Maddie is a strategist and researcher. She spends much of her time on the think tank side of Third Wave, and enjoys getting into the details of many different topics at once. Through this foraging for information, she finds ways to apply knowledge from one field in new, seemingly disparate ones, both in client work and other research. She holds an interdisciplinary BA in Computer Science, Linguistics and German, and has previously worked at VCCP and at the Science Gallery in Dublin.